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Wednesday, May 17, 2006

The Science of Sci-Fi Movie Posters

Coming Attractions! 80 Years of Cinematic Science: Movie Posters from Around the World
May 5, 2006 - Jun 30, 2006
The New York Academy of Sciences

An exhibition in the NY Science Academy's Gallery of Art & Science through June 30, brings together posters for more than 25 movies, including examples from such countries as Argentina, Germany, Japan, Russia, Great Britain, Italy, Poland, and the U.S., among others.

The exhibit includes a British poster for the re-release of Fritz Lang's Metropolis; one from France for the American eco-drama, Soylent Green; and an Argentinean poster for the Italian film, Mission Stardust. Also represented will be posters for such true-to-life dramas as Inherit the Wind, the thinly disguised rendition of the 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," and a poster for the glossy American tribute to the medical profession, Not as a Stranger.


Link

Ever since science gave birth to the cinema more than a century ago, the link between the two has been often intimate and exciting—and sometimes rather disturbing. Sort of like the relationship between Dr. Frankenstein and his creation. Countless movies have featured aspects of science and technology, both credible (or almost so) and fantastic (mostly). Just as fanciful is the varied collection of absurdly mad or strangely saintly scientist "heroes" that have populated the movies over the years.


Link

All works in the exhibition come from Posteritati Movie Posters, a New York gallery specializing in international movie art.

Watch the trialer for The Green Slime!: